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Biology Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Current Undergraduate Students  ⟩  Research Opportunities  ⟩  Biology Undergraduate Research Opportunities

We’ve made it easier for you to find out about opportunities for research participation in the Dept of Biology. Our researchers are often looking for lab and/or field assistance. By working with them, you’ll gain valuable training and research skills. See the list below for opportunities that are currently available.
 

Research TopicResearch DescriptionTime FramePosition DescriptionRequirementsTime Commitment of Student Contact Name and Email
Plant Growth and Developmental Responses to TemperatureI'm looking for highly motivated undergraduate students to join my research program, which focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants sense and respond to the changing environmental light and temperature signals. The students will learn cutting-edge techniques in molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, plant physiology, and genetics. The students are responsible to carry out experiments, analyze data, discuss the results during one-on-one or group meetings, and prepare the publications. Freshmen and Sophomores with no research background are also encouraged to contact me.Spring 2023 and onwardsVolunteer (experience is its own reward!), Biology elective credit (BISC 491), Work study (if eligible, hourly wage thru Financial Aid office)Three requirements: 1) interested in my research projects; 2) willing to learn and communicate with the professor; 3) serious about scientific research and responsible.8-10 hours per week for freshmen and sophomores; at least 10 hours per week for junior and senior students; most of my research projects will last 2-4 years so I hope the students can spend at least one year on the projects.Yongjian Qiu
yqiu@olemiss.edu
Plant response to gravityI'm looking for highly motivated undergraduate students to join my research program, which focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plant shoots and roots sense and respond to gravity. The students will learn cutting-edge techniques in molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, plant physiology, and genetics. The students are responsible to carry out experiments, analyze data, discuss the results during one-on-one or group meetings, and prepare the publications. Freshmen and Sophomores with no research background are also encouraged to contact me.Spring 2023 and onwardsVolunteer (experience is its own reward!), Biology elective credit (BISC 491), Work study (if eligible, hourly wage thru Financial Aid office)Three requirements: 1) interested in my research projects; 2) willing to learn and communicate with the professor; 3) serious about scientific research and responsible.8-10 hours per week for freshmen and sophomores; at least 10 hours per week for junior and senior students; most of my research projects will last 2-4 years so I hope the students can spend at least one year on the projects.Yongjian Qiu
yqiu@olemiss.edu
Cardiovascular Development and DiseaseWe study how the identity, shape, size and location of cardiovascular cells changes during development and diseaseOngoingVolunteer, Biology elective credit (BISC 491), Work study (if eligible, hourly wage thru Financial Aid office), Other (see researcher for details)Independent and critical thinkingCommitment of at least 10 hours a weekJoshua Bloomekatz
josh@olemiss.edu
Biochemical properties of a protein involved in apoptosisThis research involves ligand binding analysis of Bax to peptides that correspond to what is known as the 'BH3' domain of different proteins to determine the amino acids important for binding. We will also assess how peptide binding affects Bax structure using native gel electrophoresis.Fall 2022 semesterBiology elective credit (BISC 491)Background coursework in cell biology and/or biochemistry would be helpful.Approximately 6-8 hours per week for 3 credit hours of BISC 491Mika Jekabsons
jekabson@olemiss.edu
Interdisciplinary Research into Symbiotic Interactions Involving MicrobesHave you wondered how "science" and research really happen? Join us!
We seek highly motivated, curious, disciplined, and goal-oriented undergraduates who are willing to join us in the fun of discovering new things. Projects in the Hom Lab largely center around the study of microbes (bacteria, fungi, and algae) and the concept of symbiosis-the persistent, intimate living-together of living organisms. We work on a diversity of systems (see http://darwinsdaemon.com for synopses) and undergraduates are welcome to work on any of these as there is capacity. These projects include: understanding the co-evolution of fungi and algae (thick lichens and see: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.07.07.451547v4 ); engineering new microbial communities (think new fermented beverages/probiotics); ecosystem resilience experiments (think pond experiments at the UM's field station); sloths and their microbiome (e.g., see Netflix's Our Great National Parks series, episode 1 (https://www.netflix.com/title/81086133) - and bioinformatic/ computational approaches to get answers to our questions. If you want to learn more and think you might be a fit or what's possible, contact Dr. Hom. Freshman and Sophomores are especially encouraged to join us.
Spring 2023 onwardsOptions: (1) Volunteer (experience is its own reward!); (2) Biology elective credit (BISC 491); (3) if eligible through Financial Aid Office, hourly pay through the work study program.(1) The ability to follow-through and get things done independently; (2) good communication, with a habit of taking the initiative to communicate regularly. Note that those who are successful in scientific research are typically: (i) a good student )>3.5 GPA) AND very curious about how the world works, or (ii) an unusual, creative and hard working student with more real-world intelligence than comes across through grades.We have found that student success comes (and thus we expect) you to commit to ≥10 hours, ideally in 2-3 time blocks per week to research. You should want to get things done and are motivated to discover things rather than clocking in. We don't micromanage and expect you to do research even when no one is looking. In return, you will get mentoring, advice, and support beyond just a bullet point on your resume.Erik Hom
erik@olemiss.edu
Animal Behavior and Conservation Our goal is to inform conservation management through animal behavior research. Specifically, we are interested in how individual behavioral differences can assist recovery goals. We are using a nonendangered species, the Northern Bobwhite, to perform behavioral trials and determine whether there are consistent behavioral differences between individuals and whether this results in fitness consequences. The position primarily helps doctoral student Laney Hayward Nute with her research and it is Laney who will mentor the undergraduate. Most of the position is caring for the live research animals.Spring 2023 (February - May)Hourly pay or Biology elective credit (BISC 491)Reliable transportation to the UM field station, preferably by their own vehicle. Ability to work with birds; Complete animal care and use training; Complete safety training and medical exam; ability to lift 50 pounds; Be in good academic standing.Availability to work 10 - 20 hours/ week for 4 months (February - May); Morning Availability; Laney Hayward Nute
ljnute@go.olemiss.edu
Foraging Behavior and Spatial Distribution of Wildlife in Response to Indirect Predator CuesWe are looking for an undergraduate student to join our research study, which focuses on utilizing animal behavior to better understand conservation questions involving conflicts with predators and their prey. Specifically, we are focused on understanding how the foraging behavior, antipredator behavior, and spatial distribution of the northern raccoon is altered in response to indirect cues from predators. The student will be working primarily with doctoral student Jessica Stamn, but will also have the opportunity to collaborate with the geological engineering department to help build GPS collars using Arduino. The student will also implement a field study at the University of Mississippi Field Station, which involves monitoring and maintaining game cameras and other recording devices, collecting data from recordings, and analyzing data. Fieldwork over the summer may be intensive.February- August 1, 2023Hourly pay or biology elective credit (BISC 491)Reliable transportation to the UM field station, preferably by their own vehicle. Ability to walk long distances through wooded areas while carrying equipment; Ability to lift 50 lbs; Complete safety training; Be in good academic standing.Available to work 5-10 hours a week during the spring semester, and 10-15 hours a week during the summer monthsJessica Stamn
jsstamn@go.olemiss.edu